The Girl in the Glass - Susan Meissner

Price: $14.99

Format: Trade Paperback

ISBN: 9780307730428

Release: 9.18.2012

Fiction - Contemporary Women

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Take a Trip to Florence

by Becky Isaac
October 26, 2012
5 Stars
4 other readers have rated Becky's review.

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Becky's overall score for this review: 20
Becky's average score for this review: 5.0
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This is the story of three women: Meg Pomeroy, Sophia Borelli, and Nora Orsini–and the love they all have in common, Florence, Italy. Meg Pomeroy lives in San Diego and works as an editor for a publishing house that specializes in travel. The biggest influence in Meg’s life was her much loved Italian grandmother, Nonna. Meg and Nonna planned to go to Florence together after Meg’s high school graduation–Meg dreamed and longed for this trip. Then Meg’s parents divorced and to a certain extent, she lost both her Dad and Nonna. Meg no longer lived close to Nonna, so her frequent visits stopped, and her Dad didn’t spend very much time with Meg anymore. Then sadly, Nonna passed away. But before her death, Nonna made Meg’s Dad swear to make the long promised Florence trip with Meg. As an adult, Meg has traveled to different parts of the world. But the only place she really wants to go is Florence–that is the desire of her heart. She has held back going, hoping after all these years that her Dad would finally take her. Unfortunately, her Dad hasn’t been reliable in many areas, including taking Meg to Florence. He mentions going from time-to-time, but never actually does it. As the years have passed, the people in Meg’s life have advised her to quit holding out hope for her Dad, and make the trip herself. Suddenly, Meg’s Dad is promising the trip once again. This time, it really looks like the Florence vacation will happen. But will it really? Her father abruptly disappears. Is this promised trip just another disappointment from her Dad? Should Meg forget about traveling with her Dad, and go after her heart’s desire and make this trip alone? Sophia Borelli has guided tourists in Florence, Italy, for decades. After all those years, she knows the art and history of the city like the back of her hand. Sophia claims she hears the voice of Nora Orsini when she looks at the great art of Florence, and that is how she knows so much about the city. The Medici family is said to have died out years earlier. However, Sophia says she, like Nora, is a Medici and that is why Sophia can hear Nora’s voice. Sophia has written a charming book about Florence in which Sophia quotes information she claims comes from the long-dead Nora. Sophia wants Meg to get it published for her. Although Meg really likes Sophia and her writing, she knows her company won’t publish something that contains information from a “voice”. Is Sophia really hearing Nora’s voice, or is she delusional? Can Sophia truly be part of the extinct Medici family? The Medici family tie is the main reason the publishing company would want to publish the book, if that is not true, the publisher might lose interest. If these claims are disproved, will it destroy the fragile Sophia who has already endured so many losses? Nora Orsini is a member of the Medici family living in 1500′s Florence. This is the Nora that Sophia claims she is related to, and whose voice she hears–and Nora is a real historical figure. Nora’s story weaves in and out of the book with some parallels in the lives of both Sophia and Meg. I think this book is very appealing. The intertwining of the three women’s stories is interesting. I especially like the parts where the three stories intersect. The book doesn’t really present the Gospel of Christ, but God is mentioned, and the characters have some discussions about God. Florence is described so well that you want to go see this city yourself. This tale has twists and turns, and just when it looks like the ending is apparent, it takes another turn. I applaud the author for writing a wholesome story, and give this book five stars. The publisher has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book through WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for the purpose of review. All opinions expressed are my own, and I have not been compensated in any other manner.
The Author’s Web Site: http://www.susanmeissner.com/index.html More Info: http://waterbrookmultnomah.com/catalog.php?work=21350 Read Chapter One: http://waterbrookmultnomah.com/catalog.php?work=213506&isbn=9780307730428 Author Bio: http://waterbrookmultnomah.com/author-spotlight.php?authorid=83586 My blog: http://fushiacat.wordpress.com/

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